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5 Minutes to get out of a Funk in a Quarantine House

Have you ever felt those days that you were just in a mood that you can’t describe any other way than just being in a funk? As a parent it is important to get out of these funks before it can take over our entire day and change the vibes in the whole house. Here are some simple easy strategies to get on up out of that funk and continue on with a positive creative quarantine household!

  1. Find a quiet place. This is easier said than done. Especially during this global pandemic. A quiet space can allow you to have your thoughts to yourself and allow you to focus on getting “it together.” Recognizing this as a priority is going to be important. If you have another adult in the household, it is beneficial to have a conversation with them to let them know that you just need 5 minutes to yourself. When you find allotted time, even if 5 minutes, go somewhere without distractions. A bathroom, bedroom, laundry room, outside, garage, or basement. You get the idea. Once you have uninterrupted quiet time, it is up to you to figure out what is going to get you centered. Is it a favorite song? Doing a quick set of squats? Shaking off the negative vibes? Dancing? You may find that you want to just start doing this as a routine every day for 5 minutes, so that when you are in need of shaking the funk, you already have formed the habit.
  2. Deep breathing. Thankfully, this can be done even in the midst of a chaotic quarantine house. Deep breathing can help clear your mind, slow your stress, and reset your vibes. I suggest you also try doing this with your children. While they are busy counting how long they hold their breath in, you can focus on your breathing. Taking a deep breath time out is worth the try. You can close your eyes and imagine that you are taking in the salty sea air, or the organic smells of the forest, or, the greasy smell of cheese curds and charbroiled hamburgers. No judging here! While you are doing it, take a deep breath in, feel how it fills your lungs, and then blow the air out, releasing all the funk away with it.
  3. Daydream. This goes along with closing your eyes and smelling the scent of things from your memory. Do you have a favorite story you want to think about? A goal that you have in mind you want to play out? Or possibly you are just thinking about when it is bedtime and the house will be quiet. Whatever the situation, find time to allow your mind to wander. Even when the children are being loud little people, try daydreaming about what they will be like when they are older. It really is a small time out of their lifespan that we have them in front of us. I like to use daydreaming as planning time so that I can make better use of my free time. If I have already daydreamed about what I am going to do at 8pm, then when the times comes I can go into auto mode. I feel like this helps me do productive healthy things instead of visiting the old friend Netflix.
  4. Take a walk. I know, this might not be the first thing you want to try. Which is why it has taken me this long to add it. But, if you can feel that you are in a funk, chances are the rest of the people in your quarantine house can feel it also. And, it is a good habit to form. If you can not get out on a walk by yourself, take the family with you. Walk your little ducks down the road. While you are on the walk, take advantages of the air, the sun, and the sounds that you hear. Pointing out these things to your little ducklings can start them in the direction of being mindful. Have an eye spy game on hand incase you need to separate the ducklings. Hopefully, the change of scenery is enough to shake the funk, and if eye spy doesn’t work, try picking up the pace. In the rare moment you do get to get out by yourself for that walk. Really take time to appreciate the quiet and solitude that you have with yourself and practice some self-awareness.
  5. Make Someone Else’s Day. Send someone a message out of the blue letting them know that you are thinking about them. This small random act of kindness can leave you with better vibes. Pay it forward at the coffee line, or help a co-worker with something they are struggling with. This is not only a good way to shake the funk, but also to boost someone else’s mood. During this time of a global pandemic, any small random act of kindness will surely go along way.

These are some quick and easy ways to get out of a funk, you might be able to think of your own. If you do, try writing them down so you can see them when you need them. It will not become a useful tool unless you practice. Don’t give up!

You CAN change the vibes in your house, even during quarantine. It is not a bad day, just a bad moment.

Testimonials

"I believe I have been with the Center for Suicide Awareness for the past ten years helping in whatever I could do to make known to the public that the Center is here to give support to those lost a loved one to suicide. Having the experience of wanting to end my life because I no longer could bear the pain of depression. By the grace of God I did not complete my route to suicide. I was fortunate that my brain chemistry slowly began to stablize and was helped by a police sargeant who had experience with mental illnesses and helped me back to my family. Because of this experience, I have been able to help families what may have been happening in their loved ones' lives that caused them to consider suicide."

~ G.P.S.

"The Center for Suicide Awareness is an amazing organization working to reduce suicide rates, eliminate stigma, train communities in resilience and inform communities about mental health. These individuals at the center are kind, passionate, and do good in the community. The center created the hopeline for individuals in need of immediate suicide intervention. I highly recommend participating in their events, utilizing their resources if necessary, and/or getting involved in some way so that we can combat suicide together!"

~ J.K.

"As an educator, I have participated in professional development surrounding youth mental health on various occasions. I am also QPR (question, persuade, & refer) certified. Throughout these trainings, I have learned so much about the Center for Suicide Awareness and the hopeline they have created. I have the call-in and text-in number saved in my contacts and have personally used the text-in line myself during moments of high anxiety and stress. I also share the number to my students or to anyone who might need it. Please call or text in if you need help. They are there for you."

~ S.V.